Infosecurity Europe 2019, held in the Olympia, London, is a leading event in the cyber security calendar bringing business, tech and communities together. Uleska CEO and founder Gary Robinson was a speaker at the event, addressing two prevalent cyber issues, whilst Uleska exhibited to a plethora of cyber practitioners. Here are just some of the key trends Uleska noticed throughout the event.

Automation and orchestration continues to be a trend that is driving the wider cyber security industry. On the security operations side, Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response (SOAR) is gaining a firm foothold in the organisation’s mindsets.

In contrast to the software security side, Application Security Testing and Orchestration (ASTO) is a few years behind SOAR, yet the success of SOAR is helping organisations’ see the value of ASTO.

Numerous visitors to the Uleska booth were attracted by an independent (i.e. non-tool vendor) view of the coverage provided by combinations of technical tooling against their security standards and regulations they need to meet. 

Many security tool vendors will have marketing departments which promise to cover every technical issue, yet the industry realises this is not the case.  While organisations accept that no one tool will fix everything, they are finding it hard to get independent advice as to what tool coverage they do need.

Chief Risk Officers (CROs) have to deal with a lot of data. Cyber security has fought for years to get onto both the board and risk agendas and is now a firmly placed issue that must be addressed.

However, CROs have many aspects to consider. From finance, human resources, natural disasters, and geopolitics, with cyber security being one more issue to be addressed on that list.

Yet within each aspect, there are many subplots, such as for cyber, ransomware, viruses, network security, infrastructure security, application security, and more.

As previously mentioned, this means that each element the CRO has to manage, measure, and report on has to be succinct – the best case being one number of stats that shows the current state, impact, and whether things are getting better or worse. 

Application security has historically been awful at this, throwing thousands of technical issues and high/medium/lows to describe the current state, which is simply not consumable for a CRO.

Cyber value-at-risk, culminating in a single monetary risk number that changes with the real risk in the software estate, provides such a measure that CROs can work with.

Many organisations are interested in maturing to a ‘standards-based approach’ to security testing, instead of a ‘tools based approach’. 

This means they are looking at the standards and regulations they need to adhere to, and asking “Which tools and processes can be combined to provide as much coverage of these as possible?”. 

This is a much more comprehensive approach than previous doctrine which started with using one or two tools or processes, allowing them to find issues towards the end of a project, fixing those issues, and then assuming all standards and regulations were covered.

All /processes were aligned to the standards and regulations. this without doing any analysis of how those tools. This has led to blind spots in their technical programs which led to breaches.